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Live-in Care

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Live-in Care: The Questions You Need to Ask

If you are considering live-in elderly care for looking after a loved one, you will want to carry out some research before to help you make an informed decision on the best care solution that suits your specific needs. Here are a few of the questions you should ask when selecting a qualified care provider.

Live-in Care: What Is It?

You may be wondering what exactly live-in care means and how a live-in carer can help to look after your loved one as they grow older. Here is a guide to how a 24/7 carer could meet your loved one's daily needs and provide companionship so that they maintain the highest quality of life possible in their later years.

Live-in Care: What Does It Provide?

In addition to elderly care, live-in care provides support in many areas of life as well as companionship for your loved one. Read on for more details of what this form of in-home care provides.

Live-in Care: How Does it Work?

If you are looking for professional care for a loved one but are uncomfortable with the idea of sending them into a residential or nursing home, private live-in care could be the ideal solution. In addition to being practical and comfortable, this elderly care option can also be very cost-effective.

Live-in Care: What Are the Costs?

You may think that the cost of live-in home care is beyond the reach of most people, but this simply is not the case. While the costs of private twenty-four-hour care can vary considerably between different areas in the country, and there are differences between the fees from one private care provider to another, 24/7 care can be a very cost-effective care option for many people.

Live-in Care: How to Find a Carer

If you have decided to employ a live-in carer to provide care and support for your loved one, there are various ways you can go about finding a suitable person. This form of elderly care offers the best way of helping an older person to remain safe and independent in their own home when their care needs increase.

Live-in Care: How to Choose a Provider

Arranging live-in care for your loved one will enable them to continue living independently in their own home where they feel safe and comfortable, but with the added security of all the help and companionship they need twenty-four hours a day.

Live-in Care: When Is It Appropriate?

Live-in care can be appropriate on many different occasions and for a variety of people in need of some assistance with in their daily lives. As suggested by the name, this type of elderly care is carried out by a caregiver living in the home of the care recipient, twenty-four hours a day. This increasingly popular option allows people to remain in the comfort of their own home whilst receiving the support they need from a friendly and familiar carer.

Live-in Care or Nursing Homes: What's the Difference?

If your loved one has reached a stage when they need assistance with many of the aspects of their daily life, you may be considering what type of elderly care is most appropriate.

Live-in Care: How Do I Pay for It?

If your loved one needs help to remain in their own home, live-in care could be the answer. There are various ways to pay for this type of elderly care, which can be more affordable than you might think. Here are some options you may like to consider when arranging 24/7 care in the home for your loved one.

Live-in Care or Home Care: What's the Difference?

Most people say they would prefer to remain in their own home when they grow older. Independent living is often possible even when a high level of care is needed because the necessary help can be provided in a person's home. If you are considering home care or live-in care for your loved one, here is an outline of the types available.

Should Your Ageing Parent Move in With You?

The number of people living with their ageing parents is on the rise, and it's not surprising considering the increasing cost of living and lower disposable incomes many families are experiencing. A quarter of all caregivers provide disabled or elderly care in their own homes, according to the National Institute of Health. There are many positives to this arrangement, but there can also be fatigue, expense and stress involved in living with your ageing parents.

Keeping Seniors Active: How to Care for Ageing Parents

As people age, it's inevitable that they begin to slow down, but this shouldn't mean they cease to be active. Keeping fit and healthy in old age is important, for both physical health and emotional wellbeing, and finding ways to keep your loved ones active is a positive step in caring for them. Staying active can help preserve a sense of independence too, as well as helping to lower the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, depression or dementia - all conditions associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

Discharge From Hospital: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Often a hospital stay after a stroke or fall will result in lifestyle changes for elderly people. Being discharged from hospital doesn't always mean returning home to live as before. After a certain age, care doesn't end when a patient is discharged, and for family members, this can be a challenging and confusing time. Key questions may include: 'how will the discharge be carried out?', 'what do we need to know about our loved one's care needs?' and 'where will they live?'

Preventing Falls: How to Care for Ageing Parents

With the majority of people wanting to live at home for as long as possible, the best way to care for your ageing parents is to ensure that their home is as safe as possible, with the aim of preventing any falls from occurring. Falls can also happen outside the home, especially in winter, so it is important to consider all the areas that you can have some positive influence over.

Finances: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Difficult as it might be to contemplate, there may come a time in your parents' lives when they are no longer able to make decisions about their own finances. Choosing to step in and take over the management of your loved one's financial arrangements can be tricky. Even if they can see it is in their best interests, many elderly people will still find it hard to accept and may view it as a loss of independence.

Care for the Elderly: Grooming and Hygiene Guide

Maintaining good personal hygiene is important as your loved one ages, but it is not always easy to intervene if you feel they are not coping well. Poor hygiene can result in uncomfortable infections and skin complaints, so to avoid this, you or your loved one's caregiver may have to encourage them tactfully to accept some assistance. They may be more willing to agree to the support on offer if they realise that it will enable them to retain a level of independent living.

Death of a Spouse: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Losing a parent is hard, but harder still for your surviving parent, who must now face life alone after many years as a partnership. Your surviving parent is likely to be overwhelmed by feelings of grief and loss and will need huge amounts of understanding and sympathy over the coming weeks, months and years.

Staying in Their Home: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Independent living is important to many people as they grow older, and most say they want to remain in their own home, even when they need help to manage their day-to-day tasks. There are many ways of supporting your elderly parents to stay in their familiar surroundings, from providing extra equipment to arranging 24/7 care.

Cancer: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Cancer is typically a disease that affects older people. In 90 percent of all cancer cases, the person is over 50 years of age. The majority of these cases occur in people aged between 50 and 74, but a third of all cases are in those aged 75 and older. Prostate, breast and lung cancers are all quite common in older people, but this section of the population is susceptible to all form of cancer.

Loneliness: How to Care for Ageing Parents

Loneliness can profoundly impact the health and state of mind of older people. Sometimes it can be due to the death of a spouse or a close friend, or it could be that they just don't have enough of the meaningful social contact they need every day.

Eight Things to do with your Ageing Parents in Manchester

Whether your parents are still full of vitality and energy, or are more sedentary and receiving home care, or even 24/7 care, you are bound to want to take them out and about in Manchester. Finding open spaces, parks and museums is easy, but discovering interesting groups, places and activities to enjoy with them may be a little trickier.

Live-in Care or Care Homes: What's the Difference?

The difference between live-in care and a residential care home is that in the first model the person stays in their own home, whereas in the latter they move into a building with other people who also need care. If your loved one needs assistance with their day-to-day life you might think they could be better off in a care home. However, most people are happier in a familiar environment, and it is advantageous to keep them there as long as they receive the care they need. Private live-in care is the ideal answer.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Bradford-on-Avon

Benefits of regular outings for everyone, including older people, are well documented, and this jewel of a town in Wiltshire offers some fantastic attractions. Now that the live-in care in Wiltshire has become a viable alternative to residential care homes, there are more opportunities than ever to spend quality time with your elderly parents.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Bungay, Suffolk

Now that the live-in care in Suffolk has become a viable alternative to residential care homes, there are more opportunities than ever to spend quality time with your elderly parents. Here are five suggestions for days out in Bungay, and further afield in Suffolk, that should appeal to your older relatives.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Woodbridge, Suffolk

We have selected five of the best outings to enjoy in the pretty area of Woodbridge, Suffolk. For those receiving live-in care in Suffolk, these activities are ideal to do with the assistance of a live-in caregiver or family members.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Dulverton, Devon

Spending quality time with your loved ones offers everyone the opportunity to explore new places, enjoy new experiences and escape the routines of daily living. For elderly people, this can be of particular benefit. In fact, regular outings to stimulating and relaxing destinations have been shown to help increase energy levels, provide a more positive outlook and improve wellbeing.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire

Whether your elderly parents are currently living independently or receive live-in care in Buckinghamshire, they will look forward to days out in their local area of Great Missenden. If your relative is living with dementia, they may benefit from activities that include a chance to talk about the past or that tie in with their previous hobbies and interests.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire

Pateley Bridge is a small North Yorkshire market town that has many interesting shops and tearooms, so simply strolling around it can make for an enjoyable change, but here are a few attractions not to be missed. Whether your elderly parents are currently living independently or receive live-in care in Yorkshire, they will look forward to days out in their local area.

Five Things to do with your Elderly Parents in Sevenoaks, Kent

Sevenoaks is the perfect destination for a day trip or short break, thanks to its proximity to London. Situated to the south-east of the capital, just outside the M25, the town is located close to both the North Downs and High Weald, making it a popular destination for walkers, but with its wealth of history, there is plenty for everyone in the family to see and do.

Five Things to do with your Elderly Parents in St Albans, Hertfordshire

If your parents are receiving at home care or live-in care in Hertfordshire, and you are planning a day out with them, St Albans and the wider Hertfordshire region offers plenty of great things to see and do. Here are 5 things to consider doing while your there.

Five Things to do with your Elderly Parents in Saffron Walden, Essex

Saffron Walden's Medieval buildings hint at its long history, dating back to the Neolithic period. Initially a wool trading town, saffron crocus was grown here from the 16th Century, giving it its name today. Surrounded by uninterrupted views of the Essex countryside, as well as being situated just 15 miles south of Cambridge, Saffron Walden is a beautiful area.

Five Things to do with your Elderly Parents in Thaxted, Essex

Thaxted, in Essex, is set in beautiful countryside and well-known for its mix of Medieval and Georgian architecture, making it one of the most picturesque towns in the country. It boasts many historic buildings that are ideal for visits with your elderly parents, as well as plenty of other things they will enjoy doing.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Blandford Forum, Dorset

If you are looking for ways to entertain your elderly parents around Blandford Forum, you will find plenty of interesting things to do. Most of the town was rebuilt, following a catastrophic fire in 1731, but a lot of its Georgian architecture remains intact.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Totnes, Devon

You and your elderly parents will find plenty of things to enjoy in Totnes and the surrounding area. Thanks to the increased popularity of live-in care in Devon, which provides an alternative to the residential care home model, you and your loved ones can head off on day trips and short breaks with the minimum of fuss.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Helmsley, Yorkshire

Whether your loved ones have live-in care in Yorkshire, care at home, elderly care, dementia care or companion care, meaningful outings and quality time together form an integral part of their quality of life. We have selected five of the best things for you to do with your parents, to make the most of this stunning location.

Five Things to do with Your Elderly Parents in Shaftesbury, Dorset

The historic market town of Shaftesbury in Dorset is the 'gateway' to the South West, and there are plenty of things you can do here with your elderly parents in and around the town. Whether you are just visiting or have parents receiving live-in care in Dorset, here are five great attractions to check out.

Live-in Care: Can the Elderly Look After Their Pets?

Most of us will acknowledge what a great addition a much-loved pet is to our household and the multiple benefits they bring, particularly to older people. However, if you have an elderly relative who is starting to struggle with caring for their pet, you may be wondering what resources there are that may be able to help take the strain.

Live-in Care: What Does a Live-in Care Provider Do?

Live-in care is, in the most basic terms, a full-time, bespoke care-at-home service that will allow your older relative to stay safely in their own home, surrounded by their treasures and familiar things.

Nighttime Care: How to Look After the Elderly at Night

Nighttime care - also called overnight care - provides solid support throughout the night hours, enabling your loved one to feel reassured and secure. We've put together some tips to help you make sure your loved one is receiving the care they need at night.

How Can Live-in Home Care Help With Senior Depression?

Senior depression is becoming increasingly common, although it is not well understood. Everyone feels a little bit sad from time to time, and this is perfectly normal, but depression in elderly people can have insidious health effects and so it needs to be diagnosed and treated as early as possible for the best outcome.

How Can Live-in Home Care Help With Alzheimer's?

Senior depression is becoming increasingly common, although it is not well understood. Everyone feels a little bit sad from time to time, and this is perfectly normal, but depression in elderly people can have insidious health effects and so it needs to be diagnosed and treated as early as possible for the best outcome.