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Dementia Care

Elder provides specialist live-in dementia care, allowing those living with the condition to stay in the familiarity of their own home.

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Dementia Live-in Care: What is it?

Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia bring challenges both to the person with the condition and to the people who are close to them. Every individual with dementia has different needs, wishes and experiences, which is why a person-centred approach to care is so important. To provide the best care for elderly people living with dementia, the caregiver has to understand the person, be aware of their history, their likes and dislikes and what is most important to them.

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Dementia Live-in Care or Care Homes: What's the Difference?

People with dementia experience many problems, both with memory and with cognition. Alzheimer’s disease is the commonest form of dementia, but there are other types including vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. People with Parkinson’s disease can also develop dementia. Whatever your loved one’s specific diagnosis, if they are living with this condition, they are almost certain to need care and support as it progresses.

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Alzheimer's: What you Need to Know to Provide the Right Care for your Loved One

A diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease can be painful and upsetting, both for the person receiving the news and for their family and friends. You will almost certainly be concerned about how this condition will impact their day-to-day lives, both now and as it progresses. Alzheimer's Disease affects a person's memory but it can also mean they struggle with routine daily tasks such as washing, dressing, cooking and eating, and they may no longer be able to continue living independently. They might also exhibit challenging behaviour, which can be difficult to deal with.

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Alzheimer's and Diet: Does it Make a Difference?

Alzheimer's Disease has been linked to many lifestyle factors, and diet is one that many researchers believe could make a difference. A healthy lifestyle is thought to help to lower a person's risk of developing dementia, and current recommendations include exercising regularly, eating healthily and not smoking. Experts also say that maintaining a healthy weight, drinking only in moderation and ensuring your blood pressure stays in a healthy range are also important.

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Alzheimer's Care: What are the Symptoms to Watch Out For?

As our parents age, a certain degree of forgetfulness is to be expected. Other issues such as advancing technology can also make doing certain everyday tasks difficult, and this can lead to frustration and anger. The big question is how to tell the difference between typical age-related changes and actual dementia-related symptoms? It's important to know because if symptoms of Alzheimer's are detected early enough, interventions can delay the onset or advancement of the condition. In turn, this leads to a longer and more independent lifestyle.

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Dementia and Diet: Does it Make a Difference?

Although a good diet cannot slow the progress of dementia, it can make a big difference to the overall health and quality of life of someone receiving care for the condition. Eating habits can change with age; some people find their appetite has reduced, or their sense of taste and smell isn't what it once was. Combined with dementia, this can lead to problems, and without the right support, those affected by the condition may lose interest in food or simply forget to eat.

What are the Dangers of Undiagnosed Dementia?

It's understandable to question the reasoning behind a diagnosis of Alzheimer's or dementia because of the degenerative nature of the conditions and the limited availability of effective medical treatment available. While this may appear a potentially sound argument at first glance, in practice it could be catastrophic for the individual involved and their family when dealing with these cognitive challenges.

Dementia Care: What is Sundowning?

Sundowning is a distressing symptom that affects people in mid- to late-stage Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Also known by the term 'late-day confusion', it refers to the agitation and confusion often experienced by those with dementia towards the end of the day - hence the term 'sundowning'.

Eight Facts about Lewy Body Dementia

Lewy Body Dementia is a degenerative brain disease which shares symptoms with other conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These can include problems with thinking, understanding and memory, as well as confusion, hallucinations, poor sleep and difficulties in movement including tremors, slow movement and stiffness.