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Do home carers have insurance?

There are several companies that offer insurance options for caregivers, and it makes sense to ensure that any carer you employ has the necessary cover. Having a robust insurance policy in place gives the caregiver complete peace of mind. The existence of a carer’s insurance policy provides the caregiver with complete peace of mind that they won’t be sued and left in dire financial circumstances if their charge experiences an accident that could be laid at their door.

Do home carers have insurance?

Home care work may sound as though it’s relatively risk-free, but there are a surprising number of factors that could have an impact upon the wellbeing of the caregiver and that of the person that they are employed to help. Of course, everyone strives to limit the risk of accidents, but the role of a carer offers plenty of opportunities for accidental mishaps, many of which could have far-reaching consequences.

The risks involved in caring for an elderly person

In its simplest form, caring for an elderly person in their own home can involve just one or two hours a week of companion care. The caregiver may visit the recipient’s home to share some conversation over a cup of tea, or may take your loved one out for an afternoon stroll in the sunshine. But a simple mis-step could result in a broken or fractured ankle, whilst a scalding cup of hot tea has the potential to cause lasting injury to either party.

The potential for accidents increases in line with the scope and complexity of the carer’s duties. So a caregiver providing 24/7 care at home to someone with complex health issues is likely to encounter more opportunities for accidents. And as anyone providing dementia care will understand only too well, the progression of the disease offers endless opportunities for slips, trips and falls, as well as occasionally causing the elderly person in question to behave out of character.

It’s a fact that our balance deteriorates as we age, and memory problems, or just plain old forgetfulness, can lead to accidents. Add in a raft of medications to the mix, with different tablets needing to be taken at varying times of the day, and it’s clear to see that there are many opportunities for accidents and mishaps within the caring profession.

Why the home carer needs insurance

There are several companies that offer a range of insurance options for caregivers, and it makes sense to ensure that any carer you employ has the necessary cover. Elderly people don’t always have sound judgement, particularly if they are living with Alzheimer’s or dementia, whilst symptoms of other illnesses, such as Parkinson’s disease, for example, make them more prone to accidents through involuntary loss of bodily control. Add into that the fact that our balance degrades as we age, and it’s easy to see how many opportunities arise every single day for your elderly loved one to suffer an accident.

But it’s not just your loved one that you need to worry about. The role of carer comes with its own pitfalls and there is a surprisingly high rate of ill-health amongst the profession. Providing personal care for an elderly person can be physically demanding, particularly if the carer needs to use a lot of strength when moving the care recipient, helping them to bathe or dress, for example.

Having a robust insurance policy in place gives the caregiver complete peace of mind. The existence of a carer’s insurance policy provides the caregiver with complete peace of mind that they won’t be sued and left in dire financial circumstances if their charge experiences an accident that could be laid at their door.

Dulcie’s story

Dulcie is one of our longest serving customers. In this short video, she talks through the reasons behind her, and her family’s decision to choose full-time home care rather than the care home.

Insurance for the employer too

But just as the carer needs to have some form of public liability insurance in place, so too does the family of the person being cared for. That may be your loved one themselves, or if you are responsible for paying the carer’s fees, then it is also down to you to arrange adequate employer’s liability insurance. That’s because your loved one’s home is the carer’s place of work and the employer has a duty of care to the employee, ensuring their safety at all times.

Something as innocuous as a loose rug on a slippery floor, or a worn stair carpet, could result in the carer suffering a fall, with potentially life-changing results. Neither you nor the carer would want to be financially ruined by a claim against either of you, and a simple insurance policy is all that’s needed to give both parties complete peace of mind.

Finding the right insurance policy

With a huge increase in the number of people opting for care at home, rather than residential care, home care insurance is more widely available than ever before. A swift online search will reveal numerous companies who offer insurance policies for both carers and for employers, providing reassurance around the clock and covering a multitude of scenarios.

Elderly care is currently big news, with a steadily increasing ageing population. And with residential care homes rapidly falling out of favour as an option for elderly care, more and more people are seeing the advantages to be had from employing dedicated carers that enable their loved ones to remain in their familiar surroundings. Home care is thus an increasingly popular option, with both the elderly and their carers. Ensuring that adequate insurance protection is in place is an essential part of the process.

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